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These free-form wood slab “canvases” are a striking way to display your favorite prints and portraits, all the while lending a decidedly Pacific Northwest touch to bright, open rooms and hallways. Suspended alone or in multiple rows, these wooden frame mounts work best on lighter walls, where the richness of the wood can truly stand out and draw the eye. Driftwood, glass floats, seashells, and found flea market treasures make the perfect companion pieces, with carefully crafted candles suggesting your personal gallery’s special place in the heart of your home.
Steven Gambrel, one of America's top-tier interior designers, recently had a chance to consider the question. Although he lives and often works in the most urbane precincts of Manhattan, Steven grew up in Virginia and still has ties there. When the owners of a Middleburg horse farm asked him to convert one of their barns into a place for large, casual parties and just hanging out and watching TV, he took it on with relish—his first barn, and on home turf.

In the Decorist's San Francisco showhouse, by Decorist elite designer Simone Howell, everything is personal. "The living room is a place where you should feel totally at ease, whether you love a calm neutral palette or something vibrant. Layering objects like coffee table books that represent your family's passions in addition to travel trinkets such as blown glass votives bring an additional layer of intimacy to a space."
Architect Luís Bernardo Brito e Abreu renovated his São Miguel home to reflect his family's artistic, maritime history. The living room features a vintage chair by Illum Wikkelsø, and the mantel and stone benches are both of local basalt. The sculpture of a head on the bench at right is by Ernesto Canto da Maya, and the wall sculpture above the mantel is a 16th-century naval decoration.
If Marie Antoinette moved to modern New York City this would most likely be her living room decorating style of choice. Undoubtedly feminine but unabashedly opulent, this rustic hybrid space is illuminated by a Versailles-worthy chandelier, with plush carpeting and faux fur throws epitomizing all the comforts the elite could crave. Stylish scroll work shelving and a solid wooden coffee table uphold the rustic end of the aesthetic while a silver pocket watch clock and garden accents add a refreshingly personal touch. Best of all the creamy white and smooth taupe tones open up and brighten the space, offering smaller interiors a chance to shine in their own right.
A hide rug and Edwardian boxer photographic prints lend a sly masculine charm to the casual refinery of this room’s interior layout, without overtly overpowering the more graceful elements. Clean lines and simple color schemes keep the tone cool and laid back, while eye-catching pieces such as the wooden lobster trap-like ceiling lamp and repurposed rolling coffee table, as well glass dome-covered plants, allow guests plenty to admire and inquire about.
In the living room of Steven Gambrel's Chicago apartment, the custom sofa, in a JAB Anstoetz fabric, is by Dune, the 1950s chair (left) is in a Dedar fabric, and the custom armchair is covered in Arabel fabrics; the 1930s orange lacquer–and-shagreen sideboard is French, the 1950s Murano glass table lamp is by Seguso, the 1955 chandelier is by FontanaArte, the custom rug is by Beauvais, and the Venetian plaster walls are in Benjamin Moore’s Stonington Gray.
Decorate your home for less with savvy ideas for affordable, impactful updates. See how to give the rooms in your home a boost with DIY decorating projects from repurposed items, or how to use what you already own to create a brand-new look. You can get the look you love while maintaining a budget that works for you. We will show you how to spend less and get more when decorating your home.

These free-form wood slab “canvases” are a striking way to display your favorite prints and portraits, all the while lending a decidedly Pacific Northwest touch to bright, open rooms and hallways. Suspended alone or in multiple rows, these wooden frame mounts work best on lighter walls, where the richness of the wood can truly stand out and draw the eye. Driftwood, glass floats, seashells, and found flea market treasures make the perfect companion pieces, with carefully crafted candles suggesting your personal gallery’s special place in the heart of your home.
The sofas in the living room of this contemporary Hancock Park home are by RH, Restoration Hardware, the 1950s chairs are Danish, the cocktail table is by Charles Hollis Jones, the end tables are from Lucca Home, and the antique stool was a Japanese rice box. The antique mirror is Indian, the mantel is original, the pendant is by Paul Ferrante, the floor lamp is by Visual Comfort, and the sconces are by Ralph Lauren Home.
Alisa Bloom recreated the environment of a French interior in her sophisticated Chicago penthouse. In the living room, she opted for a custom sofa in a Kravet fabric with pillows in a Jim Thompson silk. The 1970s chairs are from Revival, and the vintage cocktail table is from Martin La Brocante. She finished the space with a console by Crate & Barrel, a vintage chandelier by Hans-Agne Jakobsson, and curtains in an Oscar de la Renta fabric for Lee Jofa. The walls are painted in Benjamin Moore’s Cement Gray.
In the living room of Steven Gambrel's Chicago apartment, the custom sofa, in a JAB Anstoetz fabric, is by Dune, the 1950s chair (left) is in a Dedar fabric, and the custom armchair is covered in Arabel fabrics; the 1930s orange lacquer–and-shagreen sideboard is French, the 1950s Murano glass table lamp is by Seguso, the 1955 chandelier is by FontanaArte, the custom rug is by Beauvais, and the Venetian plaster walls are in Benjamin Moore’s Stonington Gray.
Casters are the ultimate quick-change agents. These babies impart height and mobility to almost anything. Attach 'em to a farm table and voilà: It becomes an extra-large kitchen island with serious moves. Pop some wheels on a crate and you've got storage that rolls easily underneath a counter. The possibilities are truly endless. —Paige Schnell, Tracery Interiors
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